Medals presented at the ACCMCC (Greenhill, Horsley, Mohar, Stones)

Bojan Mohar (Euler medal), Catherine Greenhill (Hall medal), Daniel Horsley (Kirkman medal), Rebecca Stones (Kirkman medal)

 2010 Hall Medal award to Catherine Greenhill
Catherine Greenhill’s research is primarily on discrete stochastic processes and random combinatorial structures. She has worked in at least four distinct areas of combinatorics and computer science, and has made very significant contributions to the study of random graphs, graph colourings, Markov chains, asymptotic enumeration, and complexity theory. She has published almost 40 journal and conference papers. Her nominators speak of her “expert application of advanced technical methods”, and her “reputation of being carefully precise, highly dedicated and very imaginative".

2010 Euler Medal award to Bojan Mohar
Bojan Mohar’s outstanding research and leadership over a period of thirty years place him as one of today’s foremost discrete mathematicians worldwide. His deep and important contributions have dramatically improved our understanding of the structural properties of graphs. His research spans many areas, including topological graph theory, graph minors, infinite graphs, spectral graph theory, algebraic graph theory, and computational geometry. He has published more than 200 journal and conference papers (with more than 25 submitted), and has almost 100 collaborators. His nominators speak of his “tremendous intellectual energy”, “fantastic invited talks”, and “stellar record of service”.

2010 Kirkman Medal award to Daniel Horsley
Daniel Horsley’s research is in the area of graph decompositions and designs. He has worked on problems concerning Steiner triple systems with embedded substructures, decompositions of graphs into cycles, and c-chromatic designs. His PhD dissertation includes a proof of Lindner’s Conjecture on embeddings of partial Steiner triple systems, which had been open since the 1970s. He had published 11 journal publications, with five more submitted. His nominators state that “the quality of these publications [...] is quite remarkable” and that “His work has been of a consistently high standard and impact."






2012 Kirkman Medal award to Rebecca Stones


Rebecca Stones has broad research interests that extend from combinatorics and graph theory to include search engine algorithms, complex networks, and phylogenetics. She had published 13 papers in mathematics, engineering and bioinformatics journals and one conference paper, and had given 15 conference and workshop presentations. Her nominators describe a researcher who “has obtained strong original results on fundamental problems” and who is “destined for an academic career of distinction”. 


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